Welcome to The Teachers´ Portal
My Page Announcements Glossaries Web links Users' Directory Contact Us

Login
Nickname

Password


Featured Events
No Events Today


Links




Survey





Results
Polls

Votes: 0
Comments: 0

Search Google


THE PROCESS OF WRITING




Let’s face it: I’m a bit of a weirdo and I actually like to write. Every beginning of the week, I check my institutional e-mail account to see if anyone has sent me a contribution to the Teachers' Portal. I approach this task with my own special reverence, knowing only too well that the chances of finding something are few and far between. If no one has sent me anything, I sit down and write an editorial myself. I don’t moan and grumble about it. Instead, I simply choose a subject which may be reasonably interesting to teachers and I go about my business of doing the writing.

As a writer, I’m not a great fan of formal plans. I prefer to sit down and start writing - whatever comes to mind. I take advantage of the fact that I’m using a word processor to change the order of sentences, cut and paste them, delete some, revamp others, check spelling etc. When it’s over, I let it rest (just like bakers do with the dough) for 15-20 minutes. I go back and re-read it looking for mistakes. (That is, to the best of my ability. In general, I’m a lousy proof-reader.) The text is then good to go.

This may be an oversimplified version of what effectively happens. Writing is clearly a very complicated task: If not, why would we be living a writing crisis? Why would university language students announce to the world they don’t like to write?

When we approach writing with students, we often forget that we are talking about a process - first and foremost, a process of discovery. From the perspective of an EFL student, this implies: (a) discovering how wide or limited their vocabulary range may be; (b) discovering how much they may transfer from their own ability to write from L1 to L2; (c) discovering how they may be forced to simplify their point of view in order to make the task of writing their thoughts in a foreign language minimally doable.

Potentially, this process is infinitely more creative than getting students to do exercises from a workbook because it is associated with giving our students "a voice" in their own learning process.

Words, which convey meaning, will also empower us. Homo sapiens, homo scribens: I think vigourously, therefore, I write.

GUILHERME BOMFIM PACHECO
guilherme.pacheco@culturainglesa.net

Guilherme is a Senior Academic Coordinator and the Editor of the Teachers' Portal.





October TEACHING WITH TECHNOLOGY
computer reading
This video snippet was prepared by Guilherme Pacheco, Academic Coordinator, for the XXIV APIES Seminar held in Vitória, Espírito Santo in September 2014. It discusses the use of technology from a pedagogical perspective and features brief interviews with Giselle Santos, Academic Coordinator & member of the Google Teacher Academy, and Colin Paton, Head of EdTech.

To watch the video, click here.




October BECOMING A BETTER TEACHER
Luke_Meddings
How can we become better teachers?

In trying to answer this question, five internationally renowned teacher trainers give us a simple tip each. Which of these tips could you put readily into practice?

Watch the following video snippet (5 minutes only) and find out why they think these tips are important.



October TEACHINGENGLISH WEBINARS
British Council
For teachers who may be interested in their own self-development, watching webinars can be an interesting source of ideas.

The British Council TeachingEnglish website offers a range of recorded webinars ranging from teaching children and teens to learner autonomy and areas most Brazilian teachers are less acquainted with, such as CLIL.

Click here to go over the full list of recorded webinars.




October JULIAN TREASURE – FIVE WAYS TO LISTEN BETTER
listen
Being able to listen to our students is crucial to interaction and the monitoring of language in the classroom. Yet, according to Julian Treasure, “we are losing our listening”. Watch this 7-minute TED TALK and find out how you can improve your listening ability.

To watch the talk, click here.




October CAMBRIDGE ESOL FOR TEACHERS
ucles3
Cambridge ESOL for Teachers is the new Cambridge ESOL Brazil e-newsletter, which aims to deepen their relationship with English teachers all over the country and to help promote professional growth for these teachers.

To subscribe to their e-newsletter, please write to info@cambridgeesol.org.br.



October REFLECTIONS ON BEING A TEACHER
etp
Is TEFL really a profession?

Scott Thornbury, leading trainer and writer in the field of ELT, has blogged about this issue. If you would like to read his blog entry, please click here.





Copyright © 2003 by Ed.Tech and GESIS
Cultura Inglesa S.A.
-------------------------------------------------------
Web site engine's code is Copyright © 2002 by PHP-Nuke. All Rights Reserved. PHP-Nuke is Free Software released under the GNU/GPL license.
Page Generation: 0.387 Seconds